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Norah Tullman-Kaltenbach

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Norah Tullman-Kaltenbach

Natalia Lucero, Author

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Norah Tullman-Kaltenbach joined the staff of SFHS in August 2018. She teaches New Mexico history, world history, and geography.

Mrs. Tullman-Kaltenbach was raised in Northern New Mexico although she was born in upstate New York. She moved here when she was six months old.

A graduate of Taos High School, Mrs. Tullman-Kaltenbach spent two years at UNM on scholarship and then took advantage of the National Student Exchange Program to go to Southern Oregon State College for a year. She studied for a year in Wales (in the United Kingdom) via an international student exchange program. At the University of Wales at Swansea, she earned a diploma in medieval and renaissance history, which also fulfilled requirements for her bachelor’s degree at UNM.

After completing her undergraduate degrees, she lived in Russia where she taught English to students training to be school teachers. She also interned at the State Puppet Theatre. She then attended Nottingham Trent University in England where she earned a master’s in theatre arts in puppetry and costume design.

Mrs. Tullman-Kaltenbach then went on to earn a master’s of fine arts degree in drama and costume design at the University of Washington, in Seattle, and trained to be a costume designer. As a costume designer, part of what she did was study fashion and dress history — what people wore in the past. She said, “Finding out what people wore in the past gave me a key into how people lived in the past — not just the wealthy people, but everybody. That was how I became interested in studying history.”

She became a teacher because she thinks it’s important for everyone to teach others at some point in their lives. “I want to share my love of learning with other people, and help them to understand themselves and the world by continuing to learn. Teaching helps me continue to learn, too. By continuing to learn we make our lives richer, and I think that’s important for our future.

“When I was in highschool,” she added, “I hated the way history was taught. But I hated it because I actually loved it and just hadn’t found my way into it yet. It is super important for students to keep their minds open. We don’t know the future, but by appreciating the past we better appreciate ourselves and those around us and can actively shape our future.”

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2 Comments

2 Responses to “Norah Tullman-Kaltenbach”

  1. Dan Marsh on November 9th, 2018 11:47 am

    Ms. Tullman-Kaltenbach;

    I’m wondering how the Spanish first encountered the Acoma Pueblo. I heard that they had previously stumbled upon a separate pueblo, then merely followed a worn trade-path between that pueblo and Acoma. If so, do you know the identity of that separate pueblo, and how far away it may have been (is)?

    Signed;
    An Avid Student

  2. Norah on November 16th, 2018 4:08 pm

    Hello Dan Marsh,

    From which source did you hear that the Spanish has ‘stumbled upon a separate pueblo’? The July 2017 issue of “Cowboys and Indians” suggests as much: “The first time the Acoma Pueblo had contact with the outside world was when Spanish explorers led by Francisco Vázquez de Coronado stumbled across the tiny outpost while heading north from Central America around 1540.” (https://www.cowboysindians.com/2017/06/a-city-in-the-sky/)

    But was that ‘tiny outpost” somewhere near Acoma or Acoma itself? I suppose it is possible to ‘stumble on’ a village on top of a mesa!

    The National Parks Service suggest however that:

    “Even though Acoma sat isolated on its mesa, several Spanish explorers visited it, including Hernando de Alvarado in 1540 (a member of the Francisco Vásquez de Coronado mission), the Chamuscado-Rodriguez expedition in 1581, Antonio de Espejo in 1583, and Juan de Oñate in 1598”
    (https://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/american_latino_heritage/Acoma_Pueblo.html)

    The National Parks Service also mentions that: “Because of its location, Acoma was one of the most resistant pueblos to Spanish rule.” BUT it also suggests that: “During early Spanish contact, reports indicate that the Acoma were friendly, often meeting expedition parties at the bottom of the mesa to greet and assist them. As time moved on and the Spanish presence became more and more persistent, however, the Acoma retaliated.” (again, https://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/american_latino_heritage/Acoma_Pueblo.html)

    So, despite its location, Acoma was perhaps not so hidden or hard to access BEFORE the Spanish arrived!

    To trace the first actual contact and to find details of how that happened we would need to track down those earliest written reports made by both Spanish conquistadores and Catholic missionaries. The Acoma or other natives would not have left written accounts at this time. UNM or one of the history museums in Albuquerque or Santa Fe may have such original documents in their archives.

    The online archives of the State Historians office at http://www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/archives/about-the-archives may have something digitized but it would be worth contacting the State Historian, Rick Hendricks at [email protected] or on (505) 476-7955. The office of the State Historian is just down the street from Santa Fe High School, on 1209 Camino Carlos Rey!

    I’d be interested to work with you to dig deeper into this matter. Please drop in to my classroom, A008.

    Best,
    Norah Tullman-Kaltenbach

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